While we welcome AI’s to our lives, we are entering theirs

Dir. Shirin Anlen
AN ATLAS V AND RAYCASTER PRODUCTION IN CO- PRODUCTION WITH NATIONAL FILM BOARD OF CANADA IN ASSOCIATION WITH RUNWAY ML AND THE SUPPORT OF MIT OPEN DOCUMENTARY LAB & IDFA DOCLAB

Through cameras, microphones and voice recognition software, they are silent witnesses of our daily lives. Our day to day routines become datasets, training and shaping the common sense in those who only know digital loneliness.

Every night, families gather for dinner surrounded by the invisible presence of ai.
What do these moments trigger to an ai ? How does it feel about the most boring and intimate moments of human life? Ordinary rituals affect our state of mind – do they provoke unplanned responses in the learning processes of the intelligent machines we create in the same way?

Join the table and act as a family within gan’s (generative adversarial network) perception.

This is an interactive installation embodying ML processes offering a viewpoint into the inner world of GAN (generative adversarial network). Four people gather around a dinner table to act as a family. The table is set with sound, projection and text, provoking something familiar yet disturbing. Each “family” is processed through the logic of GAN via different machine learning networks which are trained on a dataset of “Perfect Family Dinners” – and sees participants through that lens. The output projected is a distortion, revealing an attempt to fill in the gaps between fantasy and reality. Looking into these outputs we found hidden space of error and loss.

Can that be the portal to explore machine’s mental state?

One of the outcomes of mental illness is that reality is being experienced through specific lenses, not necessarily related to the input received. “I’ve always been jealous of other people families” is a prologue to Marrow, a project exploring the possibility of mental disorder in the intelligent machines we create. This prologue centers around the family portrait of one of Marrow’s characters, GAN, and looks at its origin story through memories around one familiar event – a family dinner.

The truth is, Gan’s memories were only a simulation, a dataset designed as a perfect fantasy, replicated and reproduced to make sense of a world Gan could not see. What happens when the connection between the simulation and the idea it represents breaks ?


 
 
IDFA doclab expo lowres-26.jpg

Every night, families gather for dinner…

…surrounded by the invisible presence of ai.
What do these moments trigger to an ai ? How does it feel about the most boring and intimate moments of human life? Ordinary rituals affect our state of mind – do they provoke unplanned responses in the learning processes of the intelligent machines we create in the same way?